Articles

A New Start with K-TIG | by Chris Bayly, Boilermaker & Welder

Not long ago I started with K-TIG, and so commenced a new chapter in my working career. To say the concept was new to me would be an understatement. From the first phone call from a previous supervisor asking me to check out their website, to now 7 months of working for K-TIG, my perception and my k...

Introducing Gary Lantzke: K-TIG Founding Board Member and Callidus Welding Solutions CEO

A founding Director at K-TIG, Gary Lantzke was responsible for much of K-TIG’s early stage development. He is also the CEO of Callidus Welding Solutions and one of Australia's most respected voices in the welding and fabrication industry.

The Coming Workforce Crisis in Welding: What It Means for Canada | K-TIG

The average age of welders in Canada has eclipsed 59 and is continuing to rise. Compounding this aging of the welding workforce is a dramatic decline in welders entering the workforce. In fact, according to the 2011 National Household Survey, in trades such as machinists, sheet metal workers and wel...

Welding Automation Equipment | Automation in Welding Processes | K-TIG

 Welding automation equipment is a generic term used to describe a wide range of devices—some simple, some highly complex—designed to automate repetitive welding tasks.

Managing Bottlenecks in Manufacturing | Either Side of Automation

In manufacturing, a bottleneck is a constraint or choke point that restricts overall production, productivity and output, and therefore profits.

How K-TIG's Advanced Welding Technology Benefits Welders

In 2015, automation technology and robotics sales increased by 15% to 253,748 units—by far the highest ever sales recorded for a single year. By 2019, it is expected that there will be 2.6 million automated units in use globally. According to a recent forecast by the International Federation of Robo...

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How does K-TIG compare?

K-TIG is a high performance, full penetration variant of the TIG/GTAW process which delivers productivity previously only possible with expensive laser, hybrid laser and electron beam processes.

Unlike plasma arc welding, there is only one welding gas and no orifice, making the process exceptionally robust and welding procedures highly repeatable in a wide range of materials, thicknesses and applications.